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Disciplinary letter containing false accusations and speculation Florida

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  • Disciplinary letter containing false accusations and speculation Florida

    I was given a disciplinary write up letter containing lies that can be proven false, speculation and things taken out of context. His boss is requiring that he return the write up signed in the morning. Based on my bosses past behavior, I strongly believe that if I make any notes or written disagreements I'll be fired on the spot. Do I have any options? (I live in the state of FL and the company only has 5 employees, previously had 9 employees)

  • #2
    DISCIPLINE in FL

    Originally posted by jknudsen View Post
    I was given a disciplinary write up letter containing lies that can be proven false, speculation and things taken out of context. His boss is requiring that he return the write up signed in the morning. Based on my bosses past behavior, I strongly believe that if I make any notes or written disagreements I'll be fired on the spot. Do I have any options? (I live in the state of FL and the company only has 5 employees, previously had 9 employees)
    Since there is not a whole lot of details, let me just say what I might consider. First, your supe is writing false statements, then HE is willing to following whatever direction his boss gives. That lends me to believe that you will probably lose your job anyway. Given that, your choice now is whether or not to admit to falsehoods (although keep in mind that, in most cases, there is verbiage that states that signing such a document is evidence only of receiving the document and not any declaration of guilt or innocence-not sure if your document has that though). OR not. Is there any indication that by signing the document, you actually keep your job anyway? It is possible you sign it and they let you go anyway. Weigh your options against your needs. The fact that they wrote up a disciplinary letter tells me that for some reason, they are not firing you on the spot though. Best wishes.

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    • #3
      Your best and, if you wish to keep your job, only option, is to sign the review. Signing does not mean you agree with the contents; it means you have been advised of management's view on the matter.
      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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      • #4
        Your best bet to possibly keep your job is probably to sign it. If you don't sign it, your chances of keeping your job most likely go down. Your choice. Good luck.
        Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

        Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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        • #5
          Agreed with the other answers. If the employer wants to legally fire you, they do not need this document to do so. I personally have told people that if they wanted to put their own version of "facts" in writing and send it to HR if that is what floats their boat. That might be just me. But the sole purpose of these types of documents is to document what was discussed and when. There is nothing that says if the employee refuses to sign the document that the refusal somehow helps the employee legally. The employee's refusal to sign actually helps the employer legally, not the employee.
          "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
          Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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          • #6
            Would it be a good idea to add a note that the employee does not agree with the review?
            I don't believe what I write, and neither should you. Information furnished to you is for debate purposes only, be sure to verify with your own research.
            Keep in mind that the information provided may not be worth any more than either a politician's promise or what you paid for it (nothing).
            I also may not have been either sane or sober when I wrote it down.
            Don't worry, be happy.

            http://www.rcfp.org/taping/index.html is a good resource!

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            • #7
              Depends on the employer.
              The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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              • #8
                Based on the OP's post, that may not be a good idea in this case.
                Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

                Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

                Comment

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