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Salaried work hours Connecticut

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  • SeniorEstimator
    started a topic Salaried work hours Connecticut

    Salaried work hours Connecticut

    Does CT have a min/max number of work hours a salaried employee must work? Our work hours are 7:30 to 5:00 with an hour for lunch. I had an incident recently where an employee was out a whole day due to a broken water heater at home. While I can sympathize with the employee, am I expected to pay for this lost day, or can I legally expect this employee to take a vacation, or make up the lost time? This employee also comes in 10-15 mins late most days. Can a salaried employee be required (requested) to make up time lost out of a 40-42.5 hour work week?

    Thanks

  • cbg
    replied
    Assuming the employee is correctly classified as exempt, then when he runs out of vacation pay you still have to pay him for the whole day, any day that he works at all. You can dock him for any full day voluntarily not worked, but he cannot be docked for coming in late.

    He can, however, be disciplined for it (both now and later); it's simply that the discipline cannot take the form of docking. Being exempt does not mean he can come and go as he pleases; it is quite legal to discipline him up to and including termination for tardies as long as he is paid correctly.

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  • SeniorEstimator
    replied
    This employee I believe would be considered exempt.

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  • cbg
    replied
    There are only two states that have any laws regulating the number of hours that can be worked and Connecticut is neither of them. No state has any laws REQUIRING an employee to work any particular number of hours.

    Exempt or non-exempt, you can require that the employee take a vacation day for the day he misssed due to the broken water heater. Exempt or non-exempt, you can require that he take vacation time to fill in if they are late. However, when they run out of vacation time, it matters whether they are exempt or non-exempt as to whether you can dock them for the time.

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  • DAW
    replied
    "Salaried" per se does not mean much. The key is whether the employee is Exempt or Non-Exempt. You need to determine this before you can get a meaningful answer.
    - Exempt Salaried employees never have a legal right to paid overtime, but have certain protections against having their salary docked. They can be docked for voluntarily missing an entire workday (such as the water heater) but cannot be docked for missing partial days (reducing vacation/PTO balances is not legally the same thing as docking the salary). Federal (FLSA) regulation 29 CFR 541.602 controls the related rules for Exempt Salaried employees.
    - Any Non-Exempt employee can be paid on a salaried or hourly basis. Non-Exempt employees must be paid overtime for hours worked past 40 in the work week. There are several possible methods for paying Non-Exempt Salaried employees. Under the most common method (29 CFR 778.113), employers can dock salary for time missed.

    http://www.dol.gov/dol/allcfr/ESA/Ti.../Chapter_V.htm

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