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Privacy/Conflict of Interest Connecticut

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  • Privacy/Conflict of Interest Connecticut

    Long story short... I work for a small (<10 people) company owned by my boss and her husband. I lieu of sick time, they offered Long Term Disability coverage. We just received the policy, and found out when questioning some other discrepancies, that the boss's husband, also a licensed insurance agent, had 'sold' the company the insurance. While he had someone else do the 'interviews' he still had full access to confidential medical information, and made direct comments indicating he was aware of specific exclusions based on my medical history. We were not ever made aware he was a participating agent, let alone receiving a commission. Do I have any recourse? I would sooner have declined the Policy than provide my employer the opportunity to browse through my medical history. And no, there is nothing in my history that has any effect on job performance.

  • #2
    There is nothing illegal in him selling the policy. I'm curious how he as the agent would know anything about your medical history that he would not know as the plan administrator. Have you filed a claim? What interviews?
    I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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    • #3
      There is no claim, it is a new policy. The interviews i was referring to were regarding my medical history during the application process. If I had been made aware that the bosses' husband would be reviewing the history, again, I would not have applied.
      The other issues surrounding this were that I was lied to and told I was not allowed to review the disability policy for more than a few minutes, or leave the building with it, and that by taking time to review it, I would be jeopardizing the coverage of my coworkers/friends. These statements were all not true, as confirmed by the insurance company. I stated these concerns in a written letter to the boss. She refused to address these concerns in any way and has now stated that if I do not stop complaining about the matter, I will be asked to leave. Am I without recourse if I am fired within a week of my employer looking at my medical file, without my permission?

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      • #4
        How you could be jeopardizing coverage by reviewing the policy for more than a few minutes is beyond me but no law was broken and I don't see how it harmed you any so there is no recourse. As the admimistrator of the plan, the husband can review the medical documentation, though it is generally wise to keep out of the loop on this. As he is the broker as well, he can not stay out of the loop. When you gave your medical history you essentially gave your permission to use this information. Why else would they ask for it?

        I'm still not sure how him mentioning what the exclusions of the policy are adversely affects you in the least.

        Honestly, I'm not entirely sure what you are looking for but writing letters complaining of things that either were an essential part of the process of obtaining a policy or were not against the law is going to make you not real popular and yes, you can be fired for it. Even if they snuck a peek at protected information when they were not entitled to (which isn't the case here) unless they fired you because of a medical condition they discivered, they could legally fire you. It would be more suspicious if they came up with another reason that wasn't a major violation of some kind but it would be legal.
        I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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