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Arizona unscheduled shift question

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  • Arizona unscheduled shift question

    I recently became the manager of a place that previously had extremely lax management. The owner wants me to cut down on overtime, and from going over the time cards, I realized that a lot of people are coming in when they aren't scheduled. For instance, someone may be scheduled from 8-5, but they're coming in at 6, two hours before they are supposed to. I have put up notices to stick to the schedule and talked to everyone about it, but on the days that I don't work, people still do it. Our time clock has a setting to not allow punching in outside of scheduled times, but I wanted to be sure this was legal. I want to be sure everyone is paid for the time they're working, but also that they're actually working when they're supposed to (not clocking in early and hanging out till their start time).

    In short, if I tell people they're only allowed to work their scheduled shift, can I legally set the clock to only allow them to punch in at those times? I couldn't find any labor law relating to this.

    Thanks!

  • #2
    You can set the clock anyway you like but if that person still comes in early and works, you have to pay for that time. It sounds like you need to treat this as what it really is, which is insubordination. If someone is told they may not come in early or work extra hours without getting approval and they do so anyway, treat is as any other rule violation. I guarantee that will take care of your problem. Once employees catch on that you are serious and they can be suspended or even fired for not following the policy, they will start complying.
    I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ElleMD View Post
      You can set the clock anyway you like but if that person still comes in early and works, you have to pay for that time.
      If they were actually working, I wouldn't even care so much. Due to the nature of the job and the times they are clocking in, there is absolutely nothing that they can be doing (work related, anyway). I guess I'll just start cracking skulls about it though, and the extra hours may be the last hours they get. Thanks for the help!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by mrotter View Post
        If they were actually working, I wouldn't even care so much. Due to the nature of the job and the times they are clocking in, there is absolutely nothing that they can be doing (work related, anyway). I guess I'll just start cracking skulls about it though, and the extra hours may be the last hours they get. Thanks for the help!
        It's time to implement a write up/disciplinary system. If you don't have the support of the owner/manager though, it is worthless! Be sure you have the support, and then start doing something about people not following the rules. It will take time, all worth while change does, but in the end, if done correctly and not in a morale killing way, it will be worth it. Good luck!
        Not everything in America is actionable in a court of law. Please remember that attorneys are in business for profit, and they get paid regardless of whether or not you win or lose.

        I offer my knowledge and experience at no charge, I admit that I am NOT infallible, I am wrong sometimes, hopefully another responder will correct me if that is the case with the answer above, regardless, it is your responsibility to verify any and all information provided.

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        • #5
          If you know they aren't working, you don't have to pay for that time. The issue is proving when they did start. Sometimes this is easy, other times not so much. When I worked in manufacturing we had a small problem with this. Employees would come in early, punch in, then go hang out in the break room and socialize, drink coffee and relax until their shift started. We could pinpoint when they actually started work fairly easily but it was a pain in the neck for payroll to do a bunch of adjustments every payperiod. One small thing we did when we firmed up the no punching in early rule was move the time clock. It had been right inside the door so it was logical for employees to punch in when they first passed by rather than backtrack from the break room before hitting the floor. By moving the clock to the entrance to the manufacturing floor, it was now more convenient to comply with the the rule. We didn't have a problem with folks showing up early and relaxing in the break room before they started, so they could keep doing that. We just didn't want to pay for that time they were talking about last night's game over coffee.
          I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ElleMD View Post
            If you know they aren't working, you don't have to pay for that time. The issue is proving when they did start. Sometimes this is easy, other times not so much. When I worked in manufacturing we had a small problem with this. Employees would come in early, punch in, then go hang out in the break room and socialize, drink coffee and relax until their shift started. We could pinpoint when they actually started work fairly easily but it was a pain in the neck for payroll to do a bunch of adjustments every payperiod. One small thing we did when we firmed up the no punching in early rule was move the time clock. It had been right inside the door so it was logical for employees to punch in when they first passed by rather than backtrack from the break room before hitting the floor. By moving the clock to the entrance to the manufacturing floor, it was now more convenient to comply with the the rule. We didn't have a problem with folks showing up early and relaxing in the break room before they started, so they could keep doing that. We just didn't want to pay for that time they were talking about last night's game over coffee.
            I am often stunned by how effective the little things truly are, lol, moving the clock changed the herd's mentality. =)
            Not everything in America is actionable in a court of law. Please remember that attorneys are in business for profit, and they get paid regardless of whether or not you win or lose.

            I offer my knowledge and experience at no charge, I admit that I am NOT infallible, I am wrong sometimes, hopefully another responder will correct me if that is the case with the answer above, regardless, it is your responsibility to verify any and all information provided.

            Comment


            • #7
              Truly. It is one of those things that had been that way for so long no one really gave a moment's thought to changing. The company had been in business for ages and the building altered several times. When the time clock was originally placed, it might have made sense to do it that way and until we noticed a problem, there just wasn't any incentive to change it. Once we did, everyone smacked themselves in the head and wondered why it hadn't been done ages ago.
              I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

              Comment


              • #8
                Whoever thought of moving the clock should have gotten a suggestion award or bonus.
                Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

                Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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