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Required to work after jury duty without pay California California

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  • Required to work after jury duty without pay California California

    I understand that employers in California have the right not to pay employees for days required for jury duty. However, I have the type of job that requires me to check my email 7 days a week and reply at odd hours. Is it legal to not pay me for a day that I have jury duty when I am still answering emails and will be working later that evening from home. I've heard that if you work any portion of the day, your employer is required to pay you for the entire day. Is that accurate?

  • #2
    What is your industry? What are your job duties?

    Your question assumes that you are salaried Exempt under the FLSA rules. Which may or may not be correct.
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
    Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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    • #3
      Yes I am a salaried exempt employee.

      I work in the technology industry as a product manager. I typically work long hours and it didn't seem right that I would have to put in for unpaid leave or use a PTO day when I would have to work several hours that night to make up for the work that I would miss. I am currently on tight project timeliness which dictate my hours.

      Thanks for your assistance.

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      • #4
        The law does not really care much about requiring the use of PTO. It is far from unusual for exempt employees to do some work, including checking email, when using PTO. Here is jury duty information on CA http://www.courts.ca.gov/24355.htm

        They need not pay you for jury service specifically and may require that you use PTO. They may not deduct pay if you are an exempt employee, particularly if you are still working.
        I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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