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I've been told that I'm expected to be "perfect" New Mexico

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  • I've been told that I'm expected to be "perfect" New Mexico

    I've been told recently that my job is a "hub" in the company, and that I'm expected to be perfect. The boss joked that I'm only allowed two mistakes a year. Other people in the company make mistakes regularly. I am only human and I do too. My mistakes are normally due to the high volume of business the company gets, and having to rush through orders, etc. I am in the boss's office regularly for making some mistake that anyone could make, but I have accused him to his face of holding me to a higher standard than other employees. That's when he says I'm expected to be "perfect." I'm tired of the stress this is causing. I've been with this company for over 15 years and I think I'm being targeted for personal reasons and not just job-related ones.

    Although I don't think there is any race discrimination or anything like that, I think being told I have to be perfect is an impossible performance standard and is something I should be able to take action for.

    This is a family-owned company and there are not even any written job descriptions for anybody, yet I am held to an impossible standard.

    What are my options?
    Last edited by Doc Workaday; 03-01-2016, 08:00 AM.

  • #2
    There is no legal action you can take. Yes, bosses can expect perfection, and yes, they can hold employees to different standards for reasons other than those specifically prohibited by law.

    Your choices are to find another job or learn to live with it.

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    • #3
      It might not be fair but it is not illegal.
      Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

      Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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      • #4
        If you are regularly making mistakes, this isn't the job for you. Either pay better attention to the work you do, or seek employment elsewhere.
        I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ElleMD View Post
          If you are regularly making mistakes, this isn't the job for you. Either pay better attention to the work you do, or seek employment elsewhere.
          I'm seeking work elsewhere.

          My current boss is actually the strictest one I've ever worked for. I previously worked in a fairly prestigious position with another organization and I had a reputation for being able to do no wrong. The company I currently work for is a high-volume business, and everyone in the organization makes mistakes because there is just too much business to keep track of 100%. You just don't have the hours in the day to be thorough and go over everything with a fine-toothed comb. My current boss responds to every change by giving me more work, and after working there almost 16 years it's starting to overwhelm me. I would quit today if I could.

          You're right that this isn't the job for me. After 15+ years my job has suddenly become the clearinghouse for everything that doesn't belong in another job description, and it's beginning to overwhelm me.

          My main point in starting this thread is that I'm held to a higher standard than other people doing similar things in the organization, and people here seem to think it's not discrimination.
          Last edited by Doc Workaday; 03-01-2016, 11:27 AM.

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          • #6
            I joke that the largest part of my job descriptions is the "other duties as assigned".
            I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ElleMD View Post
              I joke that the largest part of my job descriptions is the "other duties as assigned".
              That was the joke when I worked in state government, for sure.

              My problem right now is I think my current boss has some personal vendetta against me, and that's why he's putting the screws to me as far as "I need you to be perfect." I've been at this job for nearly 16 years, so I obviously was good enough until just recently (the boss is the owner). I just see a tendency to let everyone else in the building slide without so much as a mention when they make a mistake, but I have to endure a half-hour lecture every time even the most insignificant error is made.

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              • #8
                This is perfectly legal. You may not like it, it may not seem fair to you, but it is still legal.

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                • #9
                  Based on what you have posted, it's not illegal discrimination.

                  Most people don't realize that most discrimination is 100% legal. Unless it is based in a characteristic protected by law (race, religion, national origin etc.) there's nothing illegal about it.

                  We all discriminate every day of our lives. We discriminate when we choose chicken over steak; the blue shirt over the green one; the book by Robin Cook over the one by Michael Palmer. It's only when the discriminatory choice is a violation of civil rights laws that it's illegal.

                  So it's not that it isn't discrimination - it is. It's simply that since the expectation that you be perfect is based on what job you are in and not on your race or gender, etc., it's legal discrimination.
                  The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Doc Workaday View Post
                    My problem right now is I think my current boss has some personal vendetta against me, and that's why he's putting the screws to me as far as "I need you to be perfect." I've been at this job for nearly 16 years, so I obviously was good enough until just recently (the boss is the owner). I just see a tendency to let everyone else in the building slide without so much as a mention when they make a mistake, but I have to endure a half-hour lecture every time even the most insignificant error is made.
                    Again, possibly unfair but not illegal based on what you posted. Sorry.
                    Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

                    Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Doc Workaday View Post
                      That was the joke when I worked in state government, for sure.

                      My problem right now is I think my current boss has some personal vendetta against me, and that's why he's putting the screws to me as far as "I need you to be perfect." I've been at this job for nearly 16 years, so I obviously was good enough until just recently (the boss is the owner). I just see a tendency to let everyone else in the building slide without so much as a mention when they make a mistake, but I have to endure a half-hour lecture every time even the most insignificant error is made.
                      I've been there as a few other long time posters here can attest. It sticks, but it is legal. You will be amazed how much life will improve once you are out of that environment. Find your allies at your current employer who are not your immediate supervisor to use as references. If you have been there 16 years, surely there are a few managers, colleagues, and subordinates who would be willing to do this. Let them be the ones to explain the situation with your current supervisor. Likewise clients and professional contacts outside your employer can be excellent references.
                      I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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