Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

witholding pay Pennsylvania

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • witholding pay Pennsylvania

    My employer is changing the pay period for our work week. They are withholding two days pay that we will not be able to collect until retirement or termination. I have been there for seven years ,can they withhold money that I have worked for

  • #2
    No, this is illegal
    My intention is not to argue over who is wrong/right. I am here for the discussion and to learn and teach. If you dislike what I have to say or think I question you when I shouldn't, then by all means add me to your ignore list.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by dj cramer View Post
      My employer is changing the pay period for our work week. They are withholding two days pay that we will not be able to collect until retirement or termination. I have been there for seven years ,can they withhold money that I have worked for
      Before I declare the act illegal, please explain exactly what is happening with those two days.
      Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

      Comment


      • #4
        I agree with ScottB. What was the old pay period and check date and what is the new pay period and its check date?
        I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

        Comment


        • #5
          If you will not be compensated for those hours worked until you are terminated, how is it possibly legal?
          My intention is not to argue over who is wrong/right. I am here for the discussion and to learn and teach. If you dislike what I have to say or think I question you when I shouldn't, then by all means add me to your ignore list.

          Comment


          • #6
            It has to do with how much the employee is in "arrears". If the OP would answer the question, I could explain.
            I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Villain View Post
              If you will not be compensated for those hours worked until you are terminated, how is it possibly legal?
              I agree that would be illegal, but the OP needs to clarify exactly what is happening. It is likely that the pay dates have slipped a little, but the employee is being paid for the hours worked. Like Patty said.
              Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

              Comment


              • #8
                Ok then I would be inclined to aggree if it is a misunderstanding and is in fact arrears and not willfully withholding.
                My intention is not to argue over who is wrong/right. I am here for the discussion and to learn and teach. If you dislike what I have to say or think I question you when I shouldn't, then by all means add me to your ignore list.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Villain View Post
                  if it is a misunderstanding and is in fact arrears and not willfully withholding.
                  Ayuh. We just don't know for sure, right now. The OP needs to give more details on what days were worked, what was paid, when, etc. Makes all the world of difference.

                  I had an employee who accused us of keeping the first week's pay and NEVER paying it to the employee. Even after laying out all the time sheets and the records of pay, the employee did not understand that she was paid in full for all hours worked.
                  Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X