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  • Labor Law question

    Hi,

    I work as a photographer for a company part time, as an employee (my
    employer takes out taxes and social security). Me and about 5 other
    photographers and support people (the owner was not there but boss
    was) were photographing a youth sports league picture day, where the
    youths pose in their uniforms individually and then they get a group
    picture with their team. About half way through the event, the light
    changed and one by one we all moved our stuff to a hill; when I had to
    move due to the light I was in the middle of a team, I was trying to
    go fast, I moved the camera to the hill but I guess I did not properly
    secure the tripod legs and it fell over, causing over 300 dollars in
    damage to the camera and flash. I was not being reckless, just an
    accident on the job trying to go fast to get through all the people.
    Now my boss just called me telling me that my check was in (for over
    600 dollars) and the owner wants me to come in, pick up my check and
    write a check for the damages. Is it my responsibility to pay for the
    damages? I don't remember ever being told that I would be responsible
    for anything that I broke on the job.

    Thanks for the help, Scott


  • #2
    Labor Law question


    "Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    Hi, I work as a photographer for a company part time, as an employee (my employer takes out taxes and social security). Me and about 5 other photographers and support people (the owner was not there but boss was) were photographing a youth sports league picture day, where the youths pose in their uniforms individually and then they get a group picture with their team. About half way through the event, the light changed and one by one we all moved our stuff to a hill; when I had to move due to the light I was in the middle of a team, I was trying to go fast, I moved the camera to the hill but I guess I did not properly secure the tripod legs and it fell over, causing over 300 dollars in damage to the camera and flash. I was not being reckless, just an accident on the job trying to go fast to get through all the people. Now my boss just called me telling me that my check was in (for over 600 dollars) and the owner wants me to come in, pick up my check and write a check for the damages. Is it my responsibility to pay for the damages? I don't remember ever being told that I would be responsible for anything that I broke on the job. Thanks for the help, Scott
    This is not legal advice, just an opinion.

    If the company gave you no instructions or anything in writing as to damge
    caused to their property, by you, or other means, then they really don't
    have much to stand on.
    If they can come up with some kind of document showing this, then they'd
    have to prove that you knew about it.
    Ask the other photographers if they know about such an agreement. If not,
    the company may be in for a surprise.
    If you want to remain working for the company, agree to pay for damage on a
    weekly bassis, such as 50 bucks a week. They would say that you caused the
    damage through carelessness.



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    • #3
      Labor Law question

      Scott <[email protected]> wrote:
      [OP works as a part-time employee, made a mistake which resulted in
      over $300 damage to a camera.]
      Now my boss just called me telling me that my check was in (for over600 dollars) and the owner wants me to come in, pick up my check andwrite a check for the damages. Is it my responsibility to pay for thedamages? I don't remember ever being told that I would be responsiblefor anything that I broke on the job.
      It would help if you told us what state this happened in. In
      California you would not be responsible for accidental breakage,
      regardless of what it might say in your employment contract.

      If they are firing you over this, it would be worthwhile to make a
      fuss over it and refuse to pay. But if they are going to continue to
      employ you, it might be a good idea to make a deal to pay them back in
      installments. If you made $600 from one event, continued employment
      might be worth more to you than asserting your right to not be charged
      $300 for accidental damages.

      I notice that your boss is giving you the full check (over $600)
      and wants you to pay separately for the damages. This suggests to me
      that your boss knows they don't have a legal right to charge you for
      the damages and is trying to get you to give up your right by
      "voluntarily" paying for them in a separate transaction.

      This is for discussion purposes only, and is not legal advice. I'm
      not a lawyer. If you want legal advice, hire a lawyer.

      --
      I pledge allegiance to the Constitution of the United States of America, and
      to the republic which it established, one nation from many peoples, promising
      liberty and justice for all.

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