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About to be terminated. . .questions about the meeting

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  • About to be terminated. . .questions about the meeting

    I am about to be fired for an issue which I will probably discuss here in a later forum. For now, though, the Executive VP wants to see me tomorrow. I was "sent home until further notice" about a week ago and can read the writing on the wall. I'm in Colorado, here are my questions.

    1. Should I sign anything that they give me (releases for checks, etc)
    2. If they try to move me over to a department that pays less and I refuse because I cannot live on that amount, can they say that I voluntarily resigned?

  • #2
    1.) It depends on what they want you to sign. No one here can say what hypothetical documents you should or should not sign.

    2.) Yes. As, indeed, you will have.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by cbg View Post
      1.) It depends on what they want you to sign. No one here can say what hypothetical documents you should or should not sign.
      Well, since I haven't the foggiest notion of what they would want me to sign, basically my answer will be that I need to talk to a lawyer.


      2.) Yes. As, indeed, you will have.
      Figured they would be arguing that. Of course, there's a little more to the story, but I will go over that in later posts if and when I do get the axe.
      Thanks for the response.

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      • #4
        Soft suggestions:

        1. If asked to,sign a receipt that you got something....consider doing so..to,refuse could,add up to misconduct / insubordination
        2. If asked to sign an agreement..get enough time to think it through with resource of your choose or don't sign what you don't know or understand
        3. Depending on your state and even local winds ..a major cut in hours or salary could,still,qualify you for UC ..and the measure of major cut may vary a lot ...30 % less may be one thing..but to refuse work at 15%!less may be a refusal to,accept,work....I have NO clue about views on UC in CO..tread with care.

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        • #5
          One thing to keep in mind with regards to #2 - if they want to move you to another department, then if you want to continue to work there that's where you work. There is no law you can invoke that will force them to leave you in your prior job or at your prior rate of pay. Depending on the job change and the amount of the pay cut, you may or may not qualify for unemployment (though you'd be much better off in most cases taking the job at the pay cut and filing a claim for partial unemployment benefits) but refusing a transfer is not just looked at as a resignation, it is a resignation.
          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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          • #6
            Agree...to refuse a lateral or even a downward lateral ...is an I just quit situation ...and it's not illegal to back you into a corner

            Hope you have a level head today ...post back....

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