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  • Documents subpoened

    A company I designed a web site for back in 1995 up through 1997 is somehow
    involved in a court case. I have been subpoened to provide all business
    documents, email, files, etc. relating to this company and/or its officers.
    I have some documention that I saved over the years. A meeting is scheduled
    for me to provide docs to their legal representative. I am neither the
    plaintiff or defendant in the case, just someone they did business with some
    years back.

    Question is: should I go to the expense of hiring an attorney, or have one
    be present at the meeting? Or is this just standard operating provedure in
    these kinds of cases and nothing to worry about?




  • #2
    Documents subpoened

    "DesignGuy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>. ..
    A company I designed a web site for back in 1995 up through 1997 is somehow involved in a court case. I have been subpoened to provide all business documents, email, files, etc. relating to this company and/or its officers. I have some documention that I saved over the years. A meeting is scheduled for me to provide docs to their legal representative. I am neither the plaintiff or defendant in the case, just someone they did business with some years back. Question is: should I go to the expense of hiring an attorney, or have one be present at the meeting? Or is this just standard operating provedure in these kinds of cases and nothing to worry about?
    Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer.

    It certainly sounds like the meeting -- most likely a deposition, if
    you've been served a subpoena -- is all about fact-finding in the
    case.

    Unless you feel you have some issues that would specifically warrant
    having an attorney present, I would not go to the trouble or expense.
    When having a deposition taken, you'll be under oath, and will be
    asked questions on the record. Just state your answers truthfully,
    and let the plaintiff and defendant worry about how it all shakes out.

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